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Party Culture at Mountain Pointe

There is lots of teen drinking and drug use at this time of year.  SADD performed a skit in collaboration with Theatre at the Prom Assembly to spread awareness of the downside of drinking and driving.

Anta Diallo

There is lots of teen drinking and drug use at this time of year. SADD performed a skit in collaboration with Theatre at the Prom Assembly to spread awareness of the downside of drinking and driving.

Anta Diallo, Staff Reporter

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Red cups and kegs. A pool polluted with girls. Music you hardly like and yellow lights.

 

Nowhere in this movie-esque scene is a meticulous plan to highlight every life threatening encounter that is likely to occur.

 

In a poll of 100 mountain pointe students, 65% said they planned on attending a prom after party. A party doesn’t always entail destructive behavior, anyone can be smart about a night out.

 

“It’s for dancing, laughing, and socializing. When things come up, you just have to know to avoid it and say no,” said Denise Alvarez, a senior, noting that drugs are common to occur at parties.

With all honesty, drugs and alcohol are readily available to us. But the well constructed taboo surrounding it is what decreased teen drunk driving by 54% since 1991 according to the CDC.

Taboos and a guardian to rebuke your every breath happen to be effective, rather than sensibilities and self control.

 

Not to say we aren’t nearing adulthood or have the right to make mistakes. But parties are a catalyst for mistakes, so finding out what’s preventable is important.

 

“If we go together, we should leave together,” said Alvarez. “You gotta watch out for your girls.”

 

Surprisingly, girls are catching up to boys concerning binge-drinking; it also takes 2 less drinks for girls to become intoxicated.

 

Ms. Agnew, director of SADD (Students Against Destructive Decisions), said that demonstrations like the one performed in the prom assembly are essential.

 

“I think there is more awareness of the dangers of inebriated driving. I think the thing that hasn’t changed is teenagers thinking they’re invincible.”

 

National clubs like SADD are always looking for new members wanting to advance safety education, whether you are driven by personal experiences or indirectly.

 

Most people pick up a drink thinking it’s the first and last, but 90% of this alcohol is consumed in the form of binge drinks.” Pick up one and you’re highly likely to continue.

 

“Everyone behaves differently when they drink,” Alvarez said, “You choose a designated driver before you get there, and if they seem tempted, just shoot them a reminder, you know?”

 

Make sure the designated driver is doing so legally and responsibly, if not, do not step foot in the car.

 

Ryan Gomez, a junior who is a member of SADD, said, “I joined because it’s not worth letting someone die over. It’s a big killer, even more than other drugs.”

 

It all goes hand in hand with being aware of your limits and your surroundings. That also means knowing what other people are capable of. Gomez suggests carrying identification and companions at all times.  

 

“It’s kind of hard to be safe if you don’t even know whose house you’re at. Usually I text at least one person so they know where I am” said Calleigh Aguilar, a junior.

 

Having people you can trust is ideal, and when you don’t drink or smoke away the night, it can only make it more memorable.

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